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Data threats don’t seem to be impacting customers’ holiday budgets, as 40% of Americans plan to spend more than $500 this season. Meanwhile, 75% of holiday shoppers plan to do their shopping online, with 62% planning to shop via computer, and 30% planning to shop via a mobile device.

The same proportion of shoppers (75%) plan to visit a brick-and-mortar store. Whether they are brick-and-mortar or online stores, most holiday shoppers (63%) plan to shop at between one and five stores. Another 28% said they will shop at between six and 10 stores.

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Sears Holdings has reached an agreement that will allow the retailer to sell an additional 140 locations.

Under terms of an agreement with the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC), 140 Sears properties that were protected from being sold through a ring-fence agreement will be released in exchange for $407 million. Sears will use the funds for “financial flexibility” and to provide contributions to pension plans for the next two years, the company said.

"This agreement with the PBGC is another positive step forward which, upon closing, will provide our company with financial flexibility while supporting our commitment to honor our obligations to the associates and retirees covered by the pension plans," saidEdward Lampert, Sears Holdings chairman and CEO. "While the lower interest rate environment has had a significant, unfavorable impact on the pension plans' funding, Sears Holdings has demonstrated its commitment to honoring this obligation."

Sears has to make a$37 millionquarterly payment to the pension plans inDecember 2017. Following the$407 millioncontribution, Sears will be relieved of the obligation to make further contributions to the pension plans for approximately two years, aside from $20 millionsupplemental payment due in Q2 2018.

Through the closing of stores, the sale of assets, and the sale of the Craftsman brand, Sears said it has reduced the number of participants in the pension plan from 400,000 to 100,000.

The retailer also reported that it had total revenues of approximately$3.7 billionduring the third quarter of 2017, compared with$5 billionin the prior year quarter, with store closures contributing to over half of the decline. Total comp store sales declined 15.3% during the quarter with Kmart store comp sales falling 13% and Sears comp sales decreasing 17%.

Edited by Nicole Freund

Written by Olya Glantsman, DePaul University, oglantsm@depaul.edu

The Community Psychology Practice Council is utilizing this column in 2018 to highlight the practice work of our members and profile their organizations. This first profile is of The Community Engagement Institute (CEI), an institute affiliated with Wichita State University. CEI partners with communities and organizations to strengthen Kansas through education, leadership development, facilitation, project management, and research. The Institute’s purpose is to (1) promote best practices in organizations and communities, (2) foster meaningful connections and engagement, provide applied learning opportunities, and (4) conduct high-impact, state-of the-art applied research. Dr. Scott Wituk currently serves as executive director of the institute and provided valuable context and history for how CEI came to be and where it is going.

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Criminal Justice Interest Group

Edited by Jessica Shaw, Boston College of Social Work

The Criminal Justice Interest Group Column features recent and ongoing work of our members. We encourage readers to reach out to the authors if they are interested in learning more or exploring potential opportunities for collaboration. We also invite readers to join one of our upcoming Learning Community Series presentations in which Criminal Justice Interest Group members share their work virtually to foster a learning community. More information, and recording of prior presentations, can be viewed at http://www.scra27.org/who-we-are/interest-groups/criminal-justice-interest-group/ .

Fostering Interdisciplinary Collaboration through Process Evaluation

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Rural Interest Group

Edited by Susana Helm, PhD, University of Hawai`i at Mānoa, Rural.IG@scra27.org ,Cheryl Ramos, PhD and Suzanne Phillips, PhD

The Rural IG column ofhighlights rural resources as well as the work of community psychologists, students, and colleagues in their rural environments. Please email Susana if you would like to submit a brief rural report for publication in this column, or if you have resources we may list here.

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Self-Help Interest Group

The Changing Shape of Self-help/Mutual Aid

The key concepts our interest group revolves around - for instance, 'self-help', 'mutual support' and 'peer-assisted' - can be understood in broad-brush terms. In doing so, the phenomena they refer to might be said to appear everywhere - in the workplace, social gatherings, big institutions, community spaces, on the internet, or at home. This raises a challenge for those of us interested in studying and/or promoting self-help and mutual support (SHMS) practices: how can we draw boundaries that allow us to distinguish where it is from where it is not? If we cannot any longer, perhaps the distinctive study of SHMA risks fading into a sort of generalized irrelevance.

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